Hottest Chillies in India
From Burma to Chennai
Introduction to Vietnamese Cuisine
Floating Markets of Bangkok
Singapore With Le Max2
Baked Chocolate Mango Tart Recipe

Sunday, 28 August 2016

Hottest Chillies in India

Indian food is known for its hot quotient across the world. The hot curries are loved all over and especially looked forward to internationally. In fact, just some time back on his last day in office, Britain’s Prime Minister Mr. David Cameron ordered for hot Indian spicy food, including Hyderabadi Saffron Chicken, Kashmiri Rogan Josh, Chicken Zalfrazi, Saag Paneer and Veg Samosas for his last supper in office! So, what is it that makes Indian spicy food such a favourite? Of course, its ingredients!

Of all the various ingredients, one of the most important ingredient also one of the deciding factor as to how the dish will turn out to be is the type of chilli used. You may be thinking, a chilli is a chilli, why to worry about its types? Well, if that’s so, it’s time that you knew about the various types of the hottest chillies found in India!

Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Cucamelon – The world’s cutest watermelon?

Excited to move into our new house with a large balcony, we starting researching on something we can easily grow organically, maybe something we could add to our salads and look cute like cherry tomatoes and that’s how we stumbled on cucamelon also known as mouse melon as they resemble miniature watermelon and are insanely adorable.

Though we did not find any stores selling the seeds in India, we thought a post will surely be an interesting short read for all gardening and food enthusiasts.

So what are Cucamelons? 

Sunday, 21 August 2016

From Burma to Chennai

The vibrant food culture of Chennai can rival that of any Indian metropolis. However, not many foodies are aware of Burmese influence on its street food. Wicked Spoon Confessions Founder Bhakti Menon and fiction writer Shri Bala take you through a culinary tour of Second Beach Lane Road in Chennai, hub of Indo-Burmese food in the city.

Friday, 19 August 2016

History of Nankhatai

The nankhatai has been around since the time when there used to be just simple plain-Jane bakeries. With the popular taste, the indigenous biscuit has survived 5 centuries to find a place in the plush multi-level bakeries of today. In fact, many you must have had this delight some time or the other, without even knowing that this is the nankhatai that your forefathers may have also had at some point in time.

The name nankhatai is made of two words—nan and khatai. For the uninitiated, nan is derived from the Persian word Naan, which is a type of flatbread. Khatai is an Afghan word and means biscuit. In fact, the biscuit is also famous in Iran and Afghanistan, where it’s called Kulcha-e-khataye. Kulcha too is a flatbread, similar to the naan. So, how actually did this name come into being and what relation does the biscuit have with a flatbread?

Creative Commons Mehul Gohil

Saturday, 13 August 2016

Fresh Tomato & Mozzarella Salad

Tomato & Mozzarella Salad is delicious salad which is easy and quick to make as it does not require marinating making it perfect as a light lunch or a simple first course.

Thursday, 11 August 2016

Cocktail Recipes with Coconut Water

Coconut water is a very interesting mixer as it pleasantly disappears into the cocktail mix with its subtle natural sweetness, earthy flavor and does not overpower the taste of the spirit. Although it goes very well with rum, it also also blends with other spirits. So lets say cheers to the weekend with these 5 refreshing cocktail recipes made with coconut water.

Saturday, 30 July 2016

Introduction to Vietnamese Cuisine

Did you know Vietnamese cuisine is regarded as one of the healthiest cuisines in the world? A wonderfully simple cuisine that celebrates food through use of fresh ingredients (fish, vegetables, rice, and a whole host of verdant herbs and spices such as Vietnamese mint, bird eye chilies, lemongrass, basil ginger and lime ) to create flavors hard to resist and relies on minimal use of oil.

When it comes to Vietnamese cuisine it is all about Ying and Yang; the sweet and the salty, the cooling and the warming, the fresh and the fermented that brings balance and the Asian principle of the five elements of spicy, sour, biter, salty and sweet. Though relatively simple at heart, food throughout the Vietnamese landscape is an expression of these 5 elements.

Let’s find out how the philosophy of Ying and Yang and the five elements are applied to Vietnamese cooking.